13 Days: The Cuban Missile Crisis October 1962 by Robert F. Kennedy (auth.)

By Robert F. Kennedy (auth.)

Show description

Read Online or Download 13 Days: The Cuban Missile Crisis October 1962 PDF

Similar nature & ecology books

The Windward Shore: A Winter on the Great Lakes

Our kingdom is fortunate to have Jerry Dennis. A conservationist with the soul of a poet whose beat is Wild Michigan, Dennis is a kindred spirit of Aldo Leopold and Sigurd Olson. The Windward Shore---his most modern effort---is a superbly written and elegiac memoir of outside discovery. hugely advised!

A Practical Handbook of Seawater Analysis

310 pages. Hardcover with airborne dirt and dust jacket. Fisheries examine Board of Canada.

Animal Modernity: Jumbo the Elephant and the Human Dilemma

The idea that of 'modernity' is vital to many disciplines, yet what's modernity to animals? Susan Nance solutions this query via a thorough reinterpretation of the lifetime of Jumbo the elephant. within the Eighteen Eighties, shoppers, the media, zoos, circuses and taxidermists, and (unknowingly) Jumbo himself, reworked the elephant from an orphan of the worldwide ivory exchange and zoo captive right into a distracting foreign superstar.

Extra info for 13 Days: The Cuban Missile Crisis October 1962

Sample text

At 2:30 we walked up to the Oval Room. The meeting went on until ten minutes after five. Convened as a formal meeting of the National Security Council, it was a larger group of people who met, some of whom had not participated in the deliberations up to that time. Bob McNamara presented the arguments for the blockade; others presented the arguments for the military attack. The discussion, for the most part, was able so and organized, although, like all meetings of this kind, certain statements were made as accepted truisms, which I, at least, thought were of questionable validity.

At 2:30 we walked up to the Oval Room. The meeting went on until ten minutes after five. Convened as a formal meeting of the National Security Council, it was a larger group of people who met, some of whom had not participated in the deliberations up to that time. Bob McNamara presented the arguments for the blockade; others presented the arguments for the military attack. The discussion, for the most part, was able so and organized, although, like all meetings of this kind, certain statements were made as accepted truisms, which I, at least, thought were of questionable validity.

For others there were continuous changes of opinion each day; some, because of the pressure of events, even appeared to lose their judgment and stability. The general feeling in the beginning was that some form of action was required. There were those, although they were a small minority, who felt the missiles did not alter the balance of power and therefore necessitated no action. Most felt, at that stage, that an air strike against the missile sites could be the only course. ' After the meeting in the Cabinet Room I walked back to the Mansion with the President.

Download PDF sample

Rated 4.39 of 5 – based on 47 votes